Thursday, October 22, 2009

FIXED: What's wrong with this photo? The fix...

*Apparently, I can't post a photo once as the original and then edit it and post it as the edit. No wonder everyone was so confused. Don't know how I didn't save the fixed one...sorry!

Ok, how to fix that photo? Simple - crop it! (Then save it!)

Here is the original:

Here is a cropped version*:

Many of you said "turn off the flash!"

Had I used flash, I probably would have agreed. Onboard flashes usually do more harm than good, and I keep mine set to off.

Almost everyone commented on the color. It looked fine on my monitor; maybe cropped the color looks better? Does it look better to you? I see what Ann means about putting the fruit on a plate instead of the cutting board to make it really stand out.

A lot of you said to zoom in - also exactly right. Zooming in (and still maintaining good focus) it better than cropping. I use a prime lens for most of my photography. A prime is simply a lens that does not twist or pull to zoom in or out. When I want to zoom, I have to move my body. The focal length is always the same, my distance from the subject is what changes.

Regardless of the type of lens you use, photos look good when you fill the frame. Filling the frame with the subject doesn't let those distracting backgrounds to take away from your subject.

The downside of cropping is that you can lose clarity in your photo. I read this a while ago, and forgot why this is true.
Some cameras will crop the image in camera; I usually crop using Picasa 3 (free!). The best thing to do - fill the frame when taking the shot, that way you don't sacrifice the clarity of the original image.

:)


See, people email me this stuff :D - it will be posted as "Voice of a Member - photo tips". What you all said about color, space, all of it - awesome tips! Send them in!

13 comments:

  1. It should be because in the original shot you had a certain number of pixels making up the image. Cropped, you keep only the pixels of the subject (you're making an enlargement and deleting the bad parts). On the other hand, getting closer you get to have all your pixels for the subject.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have noticed that on others monitor my pictures look better than my desktop, and on my new laptop my photos are clear, and more life like in color. So I agree, each monitor may have different appearances. I often take photos from afar, and then crop to take out noise of other objects. Or use a light box with macro...but that is for my food photos on my other blog.

    Cool Jen, I am learning faster with your help than on my own :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Great tips. I need to work with my zoom. Of course you are right, it is never in good focus.
    QMM

    ReplyDelete
  4. Jen, this is a great tip, however, these two photos look exactly the same to me. I cannot tell that you cropped it. Am I missing something?

    ReplyDelete
  5. thanks Jen. I thought I was going crazy.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I can't spot what's the difference of the two photos- the original and the crop one. Thanks for the useful tips @ Jen. I am learning more.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The difference is the crop. :)

    In the original the subject looks small. In the crop, the subject looks bigger, and takes up more of the frame.

    :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. I would prefer a macro shot, lots of details can be seen and the cluttered background kind of taking our eyes away from the papaya.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hmm, the closer crop is interesting, but the loss of resolution is becoming its own problem. I liked yesterday's crop, pulled out the see the whole outline of both halves, better.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I'm late coming into this but noted several observations (which I share) about differences in the way colors look on different computer screens and print. There are color balancing tools and programs for screens although I've been too cheap to try any. I know that I've finally got a gut feeling for screen versus print color and always make a lighter, slightly warmer temperary picture before printing it.

    ReplyDelete
  11. unless the photo is really REALLY clear cropping it blurs it. maybe it has to do with point of focus on the foto and when you crop you can change the location of the point of focus (gads does this make sense) The filling the frame is a great point - it is like saying the eye of the camera sees just this, not all the context or background - setting a frame if you will. I like to use the view finder versus the larger screne on the back of many cameras for this reason, when you put the camera up to your eye you see only the small shot - not the shot plus all the surrounding area. the new point and shoot are becoming very powerful but they have removed the viewfinder on most of them (except the most expensive) and I haven't replaced my ailing old Sony for this reason.

    ReplyDelete
  12. sorry more, when you buy a monitor there are pixels noted, you have to pay attention to this number. I think my monitor is like 1600x900 - the bigger the number the smaller the image and the clearer - smaller number bigger image but not as clear.... have to watch this number if buying a laptop or a monitor. talk to those techy types about this tell them you are editing photos, they can help - be willing to spend a little more to get the best color and clarity.

    ReplyDelete

Let us know what you think, in the comments below: